Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. Please see the right toolbar for individual course websites.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Biochemistry I
AS.250.315 (01)

Foundation for advanced classes in Biophysics and other quantitative biological disciplines. This class is the first semester of a two semester course in biochemistry. Topics in Biochemistry I include chemical and physical properties of biomolecules and energetic principles of catabolic pathways. Co-listed with AS.030.315

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lecomte, Juliette
  • Room: BLC 5015  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 35/49
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
  • Room: Krieger 205  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/100
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

FYS: The Nature of Nature
AS.001.119 (01)

To understand nature, we normally apply the scientific method to dissect complexity and to identify general principles and natural laws. Fortunately, science is not the only avenue for understanding and appreciating the fundamental character of the natural world and the logic of life. This is precisely how the Greeks, without the benefit of the technological and mathematical armamentarium at our disposal today, simply by identifying critical questions, laid the foundation for modern science and contributed insight that has stood the test of time. In this First-Year Seminar, we will emulate the Greeks. We will examine the nature of nature by asking questions about phenomena we experience in our daily lives. We will read brief sources from popular science and engage in weekly conversations. For the students with backgrounds in science, these conversations are an opportunity to discover the elusive continuity and connectivity between elements in nature that siloed science education all too often obfuscates. The students without science in their background will come to understand the forces that shape our world and our lives, and discover rich links between science and humanistic thinking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand
  • Room: Jenkins 102  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (01)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (02)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (03)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 33/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (06)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 23/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (01)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (05)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Aaron
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (05)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (04)

This course is useful for many disciplines not only the life sciences. It will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications. Students will learn to work in the Unix environment, and write bash shells scripts. They will learn to program using the Python programming language, including Python libraries for graphing, fitting and for numerical and statistical computing, such as NumPy, SciPy, and Matplotlib. At the end of the semester, students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 29/36
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (02)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (07)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 10:00PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Aaron
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (08)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 10:00PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G96  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (09)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 6:00PM - 10:00PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Single Molecule & Cell Biophysics
AS.250.335 (01)

This (elective) course offers an introduction to the field of single molecule and single cell biophysics to second and third year undergraduate students in biophysics. We will examine technologies such as single molecule fluorescence, force measurements and single cell fluorescence detections that enable high precision molecular visualizations in vitro and in cells. In addition, we will cover topics of genome engineering, cell mechanics and optogenetics toward the end of the semester. Each student is expected to read two articles assigned for each week and submit a written summary. All students will take turns presenting the assigned articles to class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ha, Taekjip, Myong, Sua
  • Room: Hodson 203  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modeling the Living Cell
AS.250.302 (01)

Previously titled "Models and Algorithms in Biophysics." Introduction to physical and mathematical models used to represent biophysical systems and phenomena. Students will learn algorithms for implementing models computationally and perform basic implementations. We will discuss the types of approximations made to develop useful models of complex biological systems, and the comparison of model predictions with experiment.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 5:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Johnson, Margaret E
  • Room: Jenkins 107 Jenkins 122
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Molecular Biophysics Laboratory
AS.250.383 (02)

An advanced inquiry based laboratory course covering experimental biophysical techniques to introduce fundamental physical principles governing the structure/function relationship of biological macromolecules. Students will investigate a “model protein”, staphylococcal nuclease, the “hydrogen atom” of biophysics. Using a vast library of variants, the effect of small changes in protein sequence will be explored. A variety of techniques will be used to probe the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetic properties of this system; chromatography, spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance), calorimetry, analytical centrifugation, X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, and computational methods as needed for analysis. These methods coupled with perturbations to the molecular environment (ligands, co-solvents, and temperature) will help to elucidate protein function. Prerequisite: Introduction to Scientific Computing (250.205) or equivalent. Biophysical Chemistry (250.372 or 020.370) or equivalent. Course taught in Fall and Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Aaron
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) 189  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Molecular Biophysics Laboratory
AS.250.383 (01)

An advanced inquiry based laboratory course covering experimental biophysical techniques to introduce fundamental physical principles governing the structure/function relationship of biological macromolecules. Students will investigate a “model protein”, staphylococcal nuclease, the “hydrogen atom” of biophysics. Using a vast library of variants, the effect of small changes in protein sequence will be explored. A variety of techniques will be used to probe the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetic properties of this system; chromatography, spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance), calorimetry, analytical centrifugation, X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, and computational methods as needed for analysis. These methods coupled with perturbations to the molecular environment (ligands, co-solvents, and temperature) will help to elucidate protein function. Prerequisite: Introduction to Scientific Computing (250.205) or equivalent. Biophysical Chemistry (250.372 or 020.370) or equivalent. Course taught in Fall and Spring.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Robinson, Aaron
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G89  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Seminar in Macromolecular Binding
AS.250.420 (01)

All biological processes require the interactions of macromolecules with each other or with ligands that activate or inhibit their activities in a controlled manner. This is a literature and skills-based course that will discuss theoretical principles, logic, approaches and practical considerations used to study these binding processes from a quantitative perspective. Topics will include thermodynamics, single and multiple binding equilibria, linkage relationships, cooperativity, allostery, and macromolecular assembly. Some biophysical methods used in the study of binding reactions will be discussed. Simulation and analysis of binding scenarios will be used to analyze illustrate binding schemes, and examples from the scientific literature will be reviewed and discussed. Basic working knowledge of Python is helpful. The writing component will be in one of the common formats employed in the professional biophysics field. Recommended Course Background: AS.250.372 Biophysical Chemistry

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fleming, Karen G
  • Room: UG Teaching Lab (UTL) G89  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.250.315 (01)Biochemistry IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMLecomte, JulietteBLC 5015
 
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry RKrieger 205
 
BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.001.119 (01)FYS: The Nature of NatureT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGarcia-Moreno, BertrandJenkins 102
 
AS.250.205 (01)Introduction to ComputingMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMDamjanovic, AnaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (02)Introduction to ComputingMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDamjanovic, AnaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (03)Introduction to ComputingMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMDamjanovic, AnaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (06)Introduction to ComputingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMProcopio, MariaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.253 (01)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabM 1:30PM - 5:30PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
 
AS.250.253 (05)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabF 1:30PM - 5:30PMRobinson, Aaron 
 
AS.250.205 (05)Introduction to ComputingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMProcopio, MariaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (04)Introduction to ComputingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMProcopio, MariaUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G98
 
COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.253 (02)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabT 1:30PM - 5:30PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
 
AS.250.253 (07)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabT 6:00PM - 10:00PMRobinson, Aaron 
 
AS.250.253 (08)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabW 6:00PM - 10:00PMSorenson, Jaime LynnUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G96
 
AS.250.253 (09)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabTh 6:00PM - 10:00PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
 
AS.250.335 (01)Single Molecule & Cell BiophysicsT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHa, Taekjip, Myong, SuaHodson 203
 
AS.250.302 (01)Modeling the Living CellTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM, M 5:00PM - 6:00PMJohnson, Margaret EJenkins 107
Jenkins 122
AS.250.383 (02)Molecular Biophysics LaboratoryTh 1:30PM - 5:30PMRobinson, AaronUG Teaching Lab (UTL) 189
 
AS.250.383 (01)Molecular Biophysics LaboratoryW 1:30PM - 5:30PMRobinson, AaronUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G89
 
AS.250.420 (01)Advanced Seminar in Macromolecular BindingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFleming, Karen GUG Teaching Lab (UTL) G89