Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog. Please see the right toolbar for individual course websites.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (02)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (01)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (03)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Damjanovic, Ana
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (04)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (05)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

Introduction to Computing
AS.250.205 (06)

This course will introduce students to basic computing concepts and tools useful in many applications and disciplines, not only the life sciences. Students learn to work in the Unix environment, to write shells scripts, and to make use of powerful Unix commands (e.g grep, awk, and sed). They will learn to program using the Python programming language, graphing software, and a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or MATLAB. At the end of the semester students will complete a project coupling all components of the semester together. Brief lectures followed by extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines. No prerequisites. Course offered every semester.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Procopio, Maria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/36
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

The RNA world: from discovery to application
AS.250.212 (01)

What is the first molecule of life? RNA embodies both informational and catalytic function, making it an ideal candidate for the first genetic biomolecule. In this course, we will explore the RNA world hypothesis by introducing different RNA molecules and discussing their functions. Students will learn the history of RNA biology discoveries through current topics in the field, such as RNA interference and CRISPR. Also, we will discuss the roles of essential cellular RNA-protein complexes, such as the ribosome and spliceosome. By the end of the class, students will have a general understanding of RNA biology and be familiar with RNA biotechnology techniques. Students will also gain experience reading scientific literature to learn advances in the field, discuss current applications, ethics and social impact of RNA biotechnology. Students’ performance will be evaluated by short written essays and student-led seminars on promising new directions for the field. Recommended Course Background: (AS.250.135 or AS.020.305) or equivalent knowledge of molecular biology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Yumeng
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The RNA world: from discovery to application
AS.250.212 (02)

What is the first molecule of life? RNA embodies both informational and catalytic function, making it an ideal candidate for the first genetic biomolecule. In this course, we will explore the RNA world hypothesis by introducing different RNA molecules and discussing their functions. Students will learn the history of RNA biology discoveries through current topics in the field, such as RNA interference and CRISPR. Also, we will discuss the roles of essential cellular RNA-protein complexes, such as the ribosome and spliceosome. By the end of the class, students will have a general understanding of RNA biology and be familiar with RNA biotechnology techniques. Students will also gain experience reading scientific literature to learn advances in the field, discuss current applications, ethics and social impact of RNA biotechnology. Students’ performance will be evaluated by short written essays and student-led seminars on promising new directions for the field. Recommended Course Background: (AS.250.135 or AS.020.305) or equivalent knowledge of molecular biology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Hao, Yumeng
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (01)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Fitch, Carolyn A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (02)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Fitch, Carolyn A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (03)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Fitch, Carolyn A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (04)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (06)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 6:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Fitch, Carolyn A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (09)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 6:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Fitch, Carolyn A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (11)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 8:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Single Molecule & Cell Biophysics
AS.250.335 (01)

This (elective) course offers an introduction to the field of single molecule and single cell biophysics to second and third year undergraduate students in biophysics. We will examine technologies such as single molecule fluorescence, force measurements and single cell fluorescence detections that enable high precision molecular visualizations in vitro and in cells. In addition, we will cover topics of genome engineering, cell mechanics and optogenetics toward the end of the semester. Each student is expected to read two articles assigned for each week and submit a written summary. All students will take turns presenting the assigned articles to class.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Ha, Taekjip, Myong, Sua
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/35
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reproductive Physiology
AS.250.351 (01)

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Zirkin, Barry R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/100
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (10)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 6:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Biophysical Chemistry
AS.250.372 (01)

Course covers classical and statistical thermodynamics, spanning from simple to complex systems. Major topics include the first and second law, gases, liquids, chemical mixtures and reactions, partition functions, conformational transitions in peptides and proteins, ligand binding, and allostery. Methods for thermodynamic analysis will be discussed, including calorimetry and spectroscopy. Students will develop and apply different thermodynamic potentials, learn about different types of ensembles and partition functions. Students will learn to use Mathematica and will use it for data fitting and for statistical and mathematical analysis. Background: Calculus, Introductory Organic Chemistry, and Introductory Physics.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Barrick, Doug
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Biochemistry I
AS.250.315 (01)

Foundation for advanced classes in Biophysics and other quantitative biological disciplines. Lecture and computer laboratory. This class is the first semester of a two semester course in biochemistry. Topics in Biochemistry I include chemical and physical properties of biomolecules and energetic principles of catabolic pathways. Computer labs include extensive use of molecular graphics and modelling of reaction kinetics and pathway flux. Co-listed with AS.030.315

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Lecomte, Juliette
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (07)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (05)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Protein Engineering and Biochemistry Lab
AS.250.253 (08)

This laboratory examines the relationship between genes and proteins in the context of disease and evolution. It is a research project lab in which the structural and functional consequences of mutations are determined for a model protein. Students will learn basic protein science and standard biochemical techniques and methods in protein engineering. They will perform experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification, and structural, functional and physical characterization of proteins. No prerequisites. Courses offered in Fall and Spring semesters.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:00PM - 9:30PM
  • Instructor: Sorenson, Jaime Lynn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/24
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.250.205 (02)Introduction to ComputingMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDamjanovic, Ana NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (01)Introduction to ComputingMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMDamjanovic, Ana NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (03)Introduction to ComputingMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMDamjanovic, Ana NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (04)Introduction to ComputingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMProcopio, Maria NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (05)Introduction to ComputingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMProcopio, Maria NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.205 (06)Introduction to ComputingTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMProcopio, Maria NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.250.212 (01)The RNA world: from discovery to applicationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMHao, Yumeng 
AS.250.212 (02)The RNA world: from discovery to applicationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMHao, Yumeng 
AS.250.253 (01)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabM 1:30PM - 5:00PMFitch, Carolyn A 
AS.250.253 (02)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabT 1:30PM - 5:00PMFitch, Carolyn A 
AS.250.253 (03)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabW 1:30PM - 5:00PMFitch, Carolyn A 
AS.250.253 (04)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabTh 1:30PM - 5:00PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
AS.250.253 (06)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabM 6:00PM - 9:30PMFitch, Carolyn A 
AS.250.253 (09)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabTh 6:00PM - 9:30PMFitch, Carolyn A 
AS.250.253 (11)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabW 8:00AM - 11:30AMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
AS.250.335 (01)Single Molecule & Cell BiophysicsT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHa, Taekjip, Myong, Sua 
AS.250.351 (01)Reproductive PhysiologyW 3:00PM - 4:45PMZirkin, Barry R BIOL-UL, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.250.253 (10)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabF 6:00PM - 9:30PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
AS.250.372 (01)Biophysical ChemistryMWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 12:00PM - 12:50PMBarrick, Doug 
AS.250.315 (01)Biochemistry IMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMLecomte, Juliette 
AS.250.253 (07)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabT 6:00PM - 9:30PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
AS.250.253 (05)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabF 1:30PM - 5:00PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn 
AS.250.253 (08)Protein Engineering and Biochemistry LabW 6:00PM - 9:30PMSorenson, Jaime Lynn